Home 2017-05-25T17:24:20+00:00

Your Further Learning & Development

The aim of INTEGRA CPD is to develop a comprehensive cutting-edge programme for continuing professional development, in collaboration with practitioners like yourself and in response to your evolving needs and feedback – a programme of workshops and courses that is based on a broad-spectrum integration of all the therapeutic approaches and on embodied, relational and integral principles.

Read more about what we offer >>

How do we make our CPD learning impactful and relevant to our everyday practice? Should our own further development not be informed by the same therapeutic principles which underpin our work? In therapy as in teaching therapy, we aim to 'walk our talk' by focussing on the learning process rather than only the content - creating safe, creative and stimulating learning environments, suited to the variety of learning styles that therapists bring to the group. Our CPD workshops emphasise experiential engagement and the mind-body connection, integrating professional competence with personal process and self-awareness, combining left- and right-brain learning that translates directly into practice.

More about how we facilitate your learning >>

In our own work, we are aiming at an integration that draws on the theories, wisdom and gifts of all the therapeutic approaches. We welcome and attract therapists from across the modalities who find inspiration and challenge in the cross-fertilisation between different schools and orientations. You can read more about the main principles of our approach which can be summarised as: full-spectrum integrative - embodied/bodymind connection - relational - informed by modern neuroscience - systemic/multi-dimensional/integral - rooted in the 'Wounded Healer' - embracing uncertainty, conflict and paradox.

Read more about our integrative approach >>

Recent News from INTEGRA CPD

What are therapists looking for in their CPD training?

What have been your experiences of recent CPD events?
Useful? Boring? Inspiring? Effective?
How has it affected your practice?
See some evaluation feedback from a recent workshop.

Read more >>

Broad-spectrum Integrative North London CPD Group

Some places still available in this ongoing cross-modality CPD group, meeting in North London for 4 or 5 days per year, building an integrative community of practitioners.
Next group days for 2017: 13/14 May, 1 July, 16 Sept. 25 Nov.

Read the full description >>

Do not take our word for it! Want to know what our events are like?

Depending on topic, aims and group composition, it's usally some mixture of experiential work (role-plays of vignettes, live sessions, skills practice), theory/discussion as well as individual and group process. Have a look at what other participants are saying:

See Feedback and Testimonials >>

Some places still available:

"Relational dynamics in body-oriented psychotherapy"

CPD in Bristol with Michael Soth: 17 June (Fee: £65)

This workshop is an ideal opportunity for an introduction to Michael’s work, and specifically how he approaches the integration of the paradigm clash between the humanistic and psychodynamic traditions. It is an affordable workshop on a crucial topic, as many integrative therapists struggle to integrate these paradigms rather than oscillate between them, both in their work and in supervision.

Read the workshop description >>

This website is designed to address the continuing professional development (CPD) needs of counsellors, psychotherapists and therapeutic practitioners in general. If you are looking for a therapist, or want to work individually with one of us, please see the following websites:

Oxford Counselling and Psychotherapy

Michael has been running an Oxford-based referral service for about 25 years, helping you find the 'right' therapy for you. Assessment and referral sessions take place in West Oxford, and are primarily oriented towards Oxfordshire, but referrals and recommendations can also be made in London, occasionally nationwide and sometimes internationally.

Michael Soth

To work with Michael individually in Oxford, please use the contact form to e-mail him. He offers short and long-term individual psychotherapy, as well as individual supervision for therapeutic practitioners, coaches and consultants. He currently maintains a waiting list and is usually unable to take anybody on within less than six months.

Morit Heitzler

To work with Morit individually in Oxford, you can refer to her website. She offers short and long-term individual psychotherapy, specialises in trauma treatment (integrative, somatic, including EMDR) and offers individual supervision for therapeutic practitioners as well as complementary therapists.

All published articles & papers / presentations / hand-outs & teaching materials

You can now find all our writing, a list of all presentations (many of them available as pdf's) and all Michael's hand-outs in our new Resources section of this site.

See all Articles & Papers >>
See all Presentations >>
See all Hand-outs >>
See all Recommended Books >>
Audio >> - more mp3's to come

Since June 2013 Michael has been publishing a blog at Psychotherapy Excellence - the UK's national portal for CPD - on the dilemmas of continuing professional development in the 'impossible profession'. To make it easier for you to follow the sequence of entries (as they are really meant to build on each other step-by-step), he has created a dedicated blog site. If you have missed any of the entries, having them all in one place like that will make it easy to catch up. Here is the link:
The Impossible Profession: Counselling & Psychotherapy

Michael has been interviewed several times now for webcasts on various topics, including 'What is psychotherapy?' (see preview) and 'The embodied phenomenology of enactment' (see preview). You can find these webcasts, which feature interviews with many other well-known therapists, on sale at: Psychotherapy Excellence.

Forthcoming Psychotherapy & Counselling CPD Workshops, Courses, & Events

Apr
21
Sat
2018
Oxford: What do we mean by ‘relational’? (OTS CPD) @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Apr 21 @ 10:00 – 17:00

This 1-day workshop is an opportunity to explore in detail a topic which Michael gave a three-hour talk on in October 2016.  Since then he has refined that presentation and made it more accessible.  You can read a detailed description about the background of the topic here ...

Over the last 15 years or so, relational perspectives have had a significant impact across the field of psychotherapy. However, the wider its increasing influence has spread, the less clear it has become what we actually mean by ‘relational’. The default common denominator would be the recognition that in therapy it's the relationship between client and therapist that matters, and that the quality of that relationship is a significant indicator of outcome.

Continue reading on the dedicated page ...

 

About OTS

These workshops are being offered by OTS, which was set up by Justin Smith as an initiative to de-mystify psychotherapy and counselling and make it more accessible and affordable to the wider community. OTS is unique in bringing together therapists from a broad spectrum of therapeutic approaches, working together to tailor the therapy to our client’s needs and ‘match’ clients to therapists. Our idea is to create the best fit for what is going to work best for each client and maximise the ‘quality of relationship’ (which is widely recognised as a crucial factor in making therapy work). OTS also aims to make therapy more affordable, through offering effective group therapy.

OTS_header

 

 

Apr
24
Tue
2018
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Apr 24 @ 13:30 – 15:30

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45). From January 2018 there are 3 places available in the second group - please contact Michael for details. The cost is £55 for each 2-hour group.

download the leaflet

Dates for 2018:

16/1/18; 20/2/18; 20/3/18; 24/4/18; 15/5/18; 19/6/18; 17/7/18

These groups have been running for the last few years, and there is a consistent core of participants, but some re-arrangements have meant that 3 places are now becoming available (in Group 2).

The monthly frequency of these groups means they are not really a replacement for ongoing regular supervision, but are being used by participants as part of their continuing professional development, to deepen and enhance their practice. The diversity of modalities, orientations and styles provides a rich learning environment.

Michael's supervision style is integrative, so therapists from all modalities and orientations are welcome, and will find plenty of opportunities to learn from the diversity within the group.
Michael pays attention to parallel process on all levels (see his presentation on 'Fractal Self' at CONFER for how he has extended the notion of 'parallel process', for the purposes of supervision, as well as an organising principle for therapy generally), including how the client-therapist dynamic is picked up by the group and reflected within it. He is welcoming of experiential exploration of 'charged moments', via roleplay, within participants' need and willingness for exposure in the group.

He will focus on speaking in the language of each supervisee's approach, but an exploration of transference-countertransference dynamics is likely to be included, unless a supervisee explicitly declines this. In his approach to supervision, Michael pays attention to the embodied, non-verbal communications and unconscious processes, how they oscillate between working alliance and enactment, and how the therapist's habitual stance/position becomes involved in these conflicts and tensions. Whilst the exploration of the therapist's relational entanglement is an important aspect of the supervision, the focus is on the deepening of the client's process, and the therapist's continuing learning process. Michael believes that by embracing whole-heartedly the difficulties, paradoxes, shadow aspects and complexities of the therapeutic process, therapists stand the best chance of doing justice to their clients, as well as their own authority, effectiveness and satisfaction as a practitioner.

Apr
28
Sat
2018
Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group with Nick Totton
Apr 28 @ 10:00 – Apr 29 @ 17:00

Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2018 (Weekend 2 of 5 with Nick)

These workshops, designed for counsellors and psychotherapists from across the approaches, are an opportunity to work with and learn from two of the most experienced trainers at the forefront of bringing embodiment into psychotherapy.
Rather than grafting the body onto established practice as one more eclectic technique, Nick and Michael have been working towards a non-dualistic embodied way of being and relating in the therapeutic relationship.
This series of CPD training events provides an ideal container for your continuing professional development, rooted in your own embodied process.

For full details  regarding this unique venture in Britain's Southwest, see the dedicated page: Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2018.

It is likely that the group will continue in 2019 with another series of four weekends.

May
8
Tue
2018
London: bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists @ Terapia Centre
May 8 @ 10:30 – 17:00

This group (maximum 7 participants, meeting once every 2 months on a Tuesday in Archway, North London 10:30 to 17:00) originally organised by Eamonn Marshall, has been running since 2014, meeting 6 times per year, in varying configurations and with various members. There is obviously an established group dynamic and cohesion, and new participants would have to work with how they fit into that to develop a new shape and group. From March 2018 there are two more places available in this group, which is open to experienced therapists only from across the modalities. All of the current participants work also as supervisors, tutors or teachers alongside their private practice and share a perspective that draws from both humanistic and psychoanalytic traditions. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

Participants

This group is open to experienced therapists from across the modalities who have been working for at least 12 years. It currently has 5 members; the maximum group size is 7 participants, so from 2018 there are one or two more places available in this group. Currently we have one man and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

Format and ways of working

All of the current participants also work as supervisors, tutors or teachers alongside their private practice and share a perspective that draws from both humanistic and psychoanalytic traditions. The group has an integrative cross- and multi-modality framework and has developed a supervision style that emphasises reflections on the manifestations of transference and countertransference via enactments.

If you are an experienced practitioner and have a curiosity and interest in relational ways of working as well as psychotherapy integration, stretching beyond the therapeutic approach you originally trained in, then this may be a good group for your further development.

As with all supervisory/learning work, there is an overlap between personal and professional development, and Michael and the group have been working to find a good balance between the two. The group has evolved a culture of sharing our work in an experiential way, through role play and two-chair work alongside traditional presentation and discussion. You would need to be comfortable in sharing yourself in such a group supervision format with an emphasis on experiential learning, which naturally opens up the opportunity to discuss therapeutic perspectives, theory and practice across the modalities.

Several participants, as well as Michael, have an interest in embodied ways of working and are bringing that to the group.

Practicalities

Times: meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays 10:30 to 17:00.

With 6 participants the fee per day is £110, plus £16 per person for the room we are renting.

With 7 participants the fee per day is £100, plus £15 per person for the room we are renting.

For more detailed information about the background, format and content of the weekend workshop, download the leaflet.

If you are interested in joining this group, an interview with Michael is required. You can contact him on: michael.soth@gmail.com or 07929208217. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

If you are interested in joining this group, an interview with Michael is required. You can contact him on: michael.soth@gmail.com or 07929208217. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

The scheduled Tuesdays for the remainder of the academic year 2017/2018 are:

30 Jan 2018; 13 Mar 2018; 8 May 2018; 26 Jun 2018

 

May
12
Sat
2018
Oxford: Coaching Supervision Conference Keynote: ‘The 12 emotional labours of the supervisor’ @ Oxford Brookes University
May 12 @ 10:00 – 16:30
May
13
Sun
2018
TRS: London – What do we mean by ‘relational’? – A Relational School Study Day
 with Michael Soth @ Stillpoint Spaces
May 13 @ 10:00 – 16:30
TRS: London - What do we mean by ‘relational’? - A Relational School Study Day
 with Michael Soth @ Stillpoint Spaces | England | United Kingdom

Organised by TRS (The Relational School)

Michael is a TRS (The Relational School) member and has drawn from Martha Stark’s seminal 1999 book 'Modes of Therapeutic Action’, Lavinia Gomez’s work on object relations and the tension between humanistic and psychoanalytic traditions as well as Petruska Clarkson’s 5 modalities of therapeutic relating to develop a broad-spectrum integration of therapeutic traditions as part of the relational project. For this study day Michael will present and explore with us his particular journey since his own experience of a ‘relational turn’ in the mid-1990’s.

What do we mean by ‘relational’ psychotherapy?

Over the last 15 years or so, relational perspectives have had a significant impact across the fields of psychotherapy. However, the wider its increasing influence has spread, the less clear it has become what we actually mean by ‘relational’. The default common denominator would be the recognition that in therapy it's the relationship between client and therapist that matters, and that the quality of that relationship is a significant indicator of outcome.

However, whilst there is quite a lot of agreement that the therapeutic relationship matters, this apparent consensus breaks down at the first hurdle: there is no such level of agreement as to what actually constitutes quality of relationship. On the contrary: there is a tendency for the traditional approaches to define ‘therapeutic relating’ predominantly within their own frame of reference, taking their own paradigm of relating for granted. It is, therefore, not generally accepted that 100 years of psychotherapy have given us a diversity of distinct notions of what kind of relating is to be considered ‘therapeutic’. The common ground of ‘relationality’ is a negative distinction from classical one-person psychology and ‘medical model’ non-relationality, but beyond that it is unclear whether relating means in Gomez’s terms being ‘alongside’ as an ally or ‘opposite’ as a relational other. And then what kind of other: positive, nurturing and reparative or authentic/dialogical or transferential other? And in amongst all that, what happens with the ‘bad’ object, and who relates to it how?

A multiplicity of diverse, contradictory and complementary relational spaces

Unless we take into account these different and contradictory notions of relatedness - or in the terms of Petruska Clarkson’s seminal contribution from the early 1990's: the different relational modalities we now find in existence across the field - what we mean by ‘relational’ will remain confused and confusing. It clearly means very different things to different therapists, without - however - these differences being sufficiently acknowledged or investigated.

The therapist's internal conflict - processing the countertransference in terms of tensions and pulls between different relational modalities

Understanding how the therapist's internal conflict relates to the client's inner world - in psychoanalytic terms: processing the countertransference and how it interlocks with the transference - can be profoundly helped by understanding how the therapist is being pulled between equally valid, but contradictory and conflicting relational modalities. This understanding, i.e. how the therapist is internally affected by the intersubjective dynamic, turns Petruska Clarkson's theory of relational modalities from an abstract tool of psychotherapy integration into a clinically useful tool moment-to-moment.

This is the essence of Michael's "Diamond Model of the relational therapeutic space": seeing the relational modalities not as some range of helpful stances which the therapist consciously chooses between (one at a time), but considering all the modalities as going on all the time (as a dynamic, systemic whole). The conflicts and pulls between different relational modalities can then be reflected upon and engaged in as manifestations (and enactments) of the unconscious co-constructed dynamic.

The essential conflict: object-relating versus inter(subject)-relating

This day will be an introduction to Michael's diamond model. His starting point will be the perennial and underlying tension (and often: polarisation) between object-relating and inter(subject)-relating in the therapeutic space: the tension between 'using' each other as objects on the one hand (I-it relating, which much of the humanistic field is biased against because of its objectifying and exploitative connotations, but which Winnicott has a lot of positive and developmental things to say about) and subject-subject relating (mutual recognition or I-I relating, as advocated by the humanistic and modern psychoanalytic traditions). When we can validate both as potentially transformative and necessary ingredients in the therapeutic space, and recognise the tension between them as essential to the therapeutic endeavor (a tension not to be reduced, resolved or short-circuited ideologically, but to be entered into in each unique client-therapist relationship), a multiplicity of relational spaces – contradictory and complementary, forming a complex dynamic whole – can be seen to arise from that tension. Michael proposes his ‘diamond model’ as a map that can help therapists process their conflicted (countertransference) experience when involved in layers of multiple enactment.

Booking tickets: tbc

 

May
15
Tue
2018
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
May 15 @ 13:30 – 15:30

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45). From January 2018 there are 3 places available in the second group - please contact Michael for details. The cost is £55 for each 2-hour group.

download the leaflet

Dates for 2018:

16/1/18; 20/2/18; 20/3/18; 24/4/18; 15/5/18; 19/6/18; 17/7/18

These groups have been running for the last few years, and there is a consistent core of participants, but some re-arrangements have meant that 3 places are now becoming available (in Group 2).

The monthly frequency of these groups means they are not really a replacement for ongoing regular supervision, but are being used by participants as part of their continuing professional development, to deepen and enhance their practice. The diversity of modalities, orientations and styles provides a rich learning environment.

Michael's supervision style is integrative, so therapists from all modalities and orientations are welcome, and will find plenty of opportunities to learn from the diversity within the group.
Michael pays attention to parallel process on all levels (see his presentation on 'Fractal Self' at CONFER for how he has extended the notion of 'parallel process', for the purposes of supervision, as well as an organising principle for therapy generally), including how the client-therapist dynamic is picked up by the group and reflected within it. He is welcoming of experiential exploration of 'charged moments', via roleplay, within participants' need and willingness for exposure in the group.

He will focus on speaking in the language of each supervisee's approach, but an exploration of transference-countertransference dynamics is likely to be included, unless a supervisee explicitly declines this. In his approach to supervision, Michael pays attention to the embodied, non-verbal communications and unconscious processes, how they oscillate between working alliance and enactment, and how the therapist's habitual stance/position becomes involved in these conflicts and tensions. Whilst the exploration of the therapist's relational entanglement is an important aspect of the supervision, the focus is on the deepening of the client's process, and the therapist's continuing learning process. Michael believes that by embracing whole-heartedly the difficulties, paradoxes, shadow aspects and complexities of the therapeutic process, therapists stand the best chance of doing justice to their clients, as well as their own authority, effectiveness and satisfaction as a practitioner.

May
22
Tue
2018
Oxford bi-monthly Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group
May 22 @ 10:00 – 16:30

Oxford Ongoing Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group

An integrative, experiential CPD group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays in West Oxford (10.00 – 16.30)

maximum 7 participants - 2 places available from March 2018

Purpose and scope of group

This advanced group is open to experienced counsellors and psychotherapists from different therapeutic approaches, orientations and trainings. It is an ongoing integrative group, meeting 6 times per year, and it has been running since 2012 in varying configurations and with various members.

There is an established group dynamic and cohesion, and as new participants you, me and the existing group would have to work with how you would fit into that to develop a new shape and a new group.

Participants (2 places available from March 2018)

Three participants have been with the group since the beginning (all three are experienced TA therapists). Two embodied-relational therapists joined a couple of years ago. Other members have been from various modalities, including Gestalt, transpersonal, Core Process. There is a solid emphasis on the relational dynamic between client and therapist, including transference, countertransference and enactments.

We are looking for one or two more participants. Currently we have one man and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

Format and ways of working

The idea is for the work of the group to be grounded in clinical experience and to have a solid supervision element, but to include additional reflections and theoretical input arising from the process - this will be from an integral-relational perspective, but always stay relevant and applicable to your own style and modality. Working with the general notion of the 'reflective practitioner', we will try to integrate individual and group process as well as experiential and theoretical learning and clinical reflection.

I will attempt to make explicit and accessible some of my internal process and working models as a supervisor and group facilitator, including hand-outs and references, depending on your individual learning needs and development goals as a person and as a therapist.

The way the group has developed over recent years has been to increasingly include participants’ own process, and how that shapes their therapeutic position as well as their impact on the group dynamic and the relationships we have with each other. So there is a considerable degree of self-disclosure and corresponding emotional intensity between group members, and anybody joining the group would probably need to be curious about and open to that kind of engagement.

Practicalities

The times are established and fixed (bi-monthly Tuesdays 10.00 – 16.30 in West Oxford), but apart from that the group is open to the needs and interests of further participants. Depending on the final number of participants, the cost will be between £90 and maximum £110.

The scheduled dates for the remainder of the academic year 2017/2018 are:

6 Mar 2018; 17 Apr 2018; 22 May 2018; 3 Jul 2018

For more detailed information about the background, format and content of the weekend workshop, download the leaflet.

If you are interested in joining this group, an interview with Michael is required. You can contact him on: michael.soth@gmail.com or 07929208217. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

 

Jun
3
Sun
2018
North London – Ongoing Integrative CPD Group (currently closed)
Jun 3 @ 10:00 – 17:00

An ongoing, broad-spectrum integrative group

This semi-closed group has been running for several years now, with new participants joining the 'pool' of members as places become available. Led by one of the most experienced integrative trainers in the UK, this group will provide an ideal relational container for your ongoing development as a therapist. By immersing yourself in a diverse group of colleagues from different schools and orientations, you will widen your perspective, deepen your practice, draw both inspiration and challenge from the co-created wide-ranging experiential work and have a reference point as well as resources and teaching to support your further development.

You can find a detailed description of the format and objectives of this group on the dedicated page.

Jun
17
Sun
2018
Bristol CPD Workshop: Relational dynamics in body-oriented psychotherapy @ Windmill Hill City Farm
Jun 17 @ 10:00 – 16:30

Organised by the Association for Core Process Psychotherapy:

This follow-up workshop is another ideal opportunity for an introduction to Michael’s work, and specifically how he approaches the integration of the paradigm clash between the humanistic and psychodynamic traditions. It is an affordable workshop on a crucial topic, as many integrative therapists struggle to integrate these paradigms rather than oscillate between them, both in their work and in supervision.

Following on from a first workshop on the topic in June 2017, the Association for Core Process Psychotherapy is organising a second workshop, to continue and deepen the theme. It will be possible for you to join this day without having attended the first workshop - in preparation you will have access to the teaching materials from the June workshop. Most participants will be a Core Process therapists, which will give the day an emphasis on the body-mind and psychosomatic connection, and how attention to the two bodies in the therapeutic relationship (or better: the two ‘bodyminds’) can provide the experiential foundation for the integration of paradigms.

Exploring the tension between ‘authentic’ and ‘transference’ relating

In the lineage of Body Psychotherapy, we come across a set of diverse and to some extent confusing and contradictory assumptions as to what we mean by therapeutic relating and the therapeutic relationship. On the whole, the whole range of body-oriented work as practiced today clearly belongs to the humanistic tradition, with its emphasis on authentic/dialogical and empathic/reparative relating. This sits alongside influences from the psychoanalytic tradition, notably the work of Reich and his ideas about working with transference, as well as his quasi-medical and scientific attitude to treatment (which he shared with Freud). These different paradigms of relating are quite difficult to integrate and bring together, as they are based on polarised attitudes and stances in terms of one-person and two-person psychologies.

That raises the question as to what we mean by being ‘relational', especially in recent years, when that notion has become increasingly fashionable, and is in danger of becoming diluted. As psychotherapists working in the body-oriented traditions, we have the potential to bring a more substantial, embodied and complex notion of relating to the talking therapies.

This workshop is an opportunity to explore your own experience of the tensions between the polarised humanistic and psychoanalytic traditions, and how you integrate them. This tension hinges around the essential conflict between ‘authentic relating’ and 'working with the transference' - two principles which many of us find equally valid and want to equally do justice to in our work.

It has been understood and acknowledged for decades that any direct and directive work with the body, especially if it includes touch, intensifies the transference. However, psychoanalysts have contested that by using directive body-oriented interventions, body-oriented therapists are minimising and sidestepping the transference. In fact, all therapies that are relying exclusively on an empathic, attuned, heartfelt connection are open to that psychoanalytic challenge (keeping things too cosy, encouraging regression or over-dependency, avoiding the negative transference) and the question of whether this is in the client's best interests.

When our intention is to work with the client’s ‘character’, i.e. with all the embodied levels of developmental injury, across the whole bodymind, how do these different traditions and paradigms of relating get in each other's way or complement each other and how might they create an integrative synergy?

Recommended preparatory reading:

Relating To and With the Objectified Body: This was my first public attempt at spelling out some of the difficulties and pitfalls of Body Psychotherapy, as I had increasingly become aware of them in the late 1980's and the early 1990's. From being securely ensconced in the body-oriented subculture, it took years to recognise and formulate the hidden 'medical model' assumptions, the implicit idealisation of the body, the simple reversal of mind-over-body into body-over-mind and how I was in the habit of turning my therapeutic position into an "enemy of the client's ego". Here I state for the first time how it is perfectly possible for Body Psychotherapy to exacerbate the body/mind split whilst intending to 'heal' it.

Humanistic or psychodynamic - what is the difference and do we have to make a choice ? by Lavinia Gomez: This brilliant and helpfully clarifying article by Lavinia Gomez tackles the difficult theme 'humanistic or psychodynamic' in a non-dogmatic and fairly comprehensive fashion. Lavinia poses some challenging questions, especially for integrative therapists: how free and fluid can we allow ourselves to be in terms of combining, mixing and matching different therapeutic traditions, and what are the possible negative effects of switching approaches, especially in terms of the client's sense of containment? - This paper is essential reading for this workshop, as is my response at the time:

Is it Possible to Integrate Humanistic Techniques into a Transference-Countertransference Perspective? (2004): Whilst agreeing with Lavinia's challenges to the integrative project and the mixing of humanistic and psychodynamic paradigms, 
I argue against one of Lavinia's central conclusions, based on a different interpretation of what we might mean by 'containment' and 'enactment'.

What therapeutic hope for a subjective mind in an objectified body? This is my first attempt at formulating the 'relational turn' in Body Psychotherapy, and taking the integration of humanistic and psychodynamic paradigms further. This is the abstract: Our modern attempt to re-include the body in psychotherapy – as necessary and promising as it is – brings with it the inevitable danger that we import the culturally dominant objectifying construction of the body into a field which may represent one of the last bastions of subjectivity, authenticity and intimacy in an increasingly virtual world. Edited from my presentation to the UKCP conference 'About A Body’, this paper addresses the question how embodied subjectivity – Winnicott’s “indwelling of the psyche in the soma” - can be found within a relational matrix pervaded by disembodiment and self-objectification.

 

Jun
19
Tue
2018
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Jun 19 @ 13:30 – 15:30

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45). From January 2018 there are 3 places available in the second group - please contact Michael for details. The cost is £55 for each 2-hour group.

download the leaflet

Dates for 2018:

16/1/18; 20/2/18; 20/3/18; 24/4/18; 15/5/18; 19/6/18; 17/7/18

These groups have been running for the last few years, and there is a consistent core of participants, but some re-arrangements have meant that 3 places are now becoming available (in Group 2).

The monthly frequency of these groups means they are not really a replacement for ongoing regular supervision, but are being used by participants as part of their continuing professional development, to deepen and enhance their practice. The diversity of modalities, orientations and styles provides a rich learning environment.

Michael's supervision style is integrative, so therapists from all modalities and orientations are welcome, and will find plenty of opportunities to learn from the diversity within the group.
Michael pays attention to parallel process on all levels (see his presentation on 'Fractal Self' at CONFER for how he has extended the notion of 'parallel process', for the purposes of supervision, as well as an organising principle for therapy generally), including how the client-therapist dynamic is picked up by the group and reflected within it. He is welcoming of experiential exploration of 'charged moments', via roleplay, within participants' need and willingness for exposure in the group.

He will focus on speaking in the language of each supervisee's approach, but an exploration of transference-countertransference dynamics is likely to be included, unless a supervisee explicitly declines this. In his approach to supervision, Michael pays attention to the embodied, non-verbal communications and unconscious processes, how they oscillate between working alliance and enactment, and how the therapist's habitual stance/position becomes involved in these conflicts and tensions. Whilst the exploration of the therapist's relational entanglement is an important aspect of the supervision, the focus is on the deepening of the client's process, and the therapist's continuing learning process. Michael believes that by embracing whole-heartedly the difficulties, paradoxes, shadow aspects and complexities of the therapeutic process, therapists stand the best chance of doing justice to their clients, as well as their own authority, effectiveness and satisfaction as a practitioner.

Jun
23
Sat
2018
Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group with Michael Soth
Jun 23 @ 10:00 – Jun 24 @ 17:00

Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2018 (Weekend 3 of 5 with Michael)

These workshops, designed for counsellors and psychotherapists from across the approaches, are an opportunity to work with and learn from two of the most experienced trainers at the forefront of bringing embodiment into psychotherapy.
Rather than grafting the body onto established practice as one more eclectic technique, Nick and Michael have been working towards a non-dualistic embodied way of being and relating in the therapeutic relationship.
This series of CPD training events provides an ideal container for your continuing professional development, rooted in your own embodied process.

For full details  regarding this unique venture in Britain's Southwest, see the dedicated page: Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2018.

It is likely that the group will continue in 2019 with another series of four weekends.

Oxford: Trauma-focussed Supervision Group @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Jun 23 @ 10:00 – 16:00

Small Supervision Group with Morit Heitzler

Date: Sat. 23 June 2018 - Times: 10.00 – 16.00

Venue: OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre: 1st Floor, 142-144 Oxford Road, Temple Cowley, Oxford OX4 2EA

Cost per session: £85.00

This 1-day Saturday supervision group is an opportunity for you to specifically bring trauma clients for supervision - the day will be a mixture of clinical supervision of actual cases presented by participants and CPD learning (including some role play of case vignettes). Alongside learning from your own and other participants' experience, Morit will also give trauma-related teaching input, relevant to the themes and issues emerging from the clinical/client work.

Possible ongoing group emerging from this supervision day

There is a core group of several therapists who want this day to develop into an ongoing, regular group. The sessions will take place every 2 - 3 months from 10 - 4pm in Oxford, to be arranged in advance according to everybody's availability. The cost per session will be £85.00. If you have any questions or need more information, please contact Morit.

Jun
26
Tue
2018
London: bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists @ Terapia Centre
Jun 26 @ 10:30 – 17:00

This group (maximum 7 participants, meeting once every 2 months on a Tuesday in Archway, North London 10:30 to 17:00) originally organised by Eamonn Marshall, has been running since 2014, meeting 6 times per year, in varying configurations and with various members. There is obviously an established group dynamic and cohesion, and new participants would have to work with how they fit into that to develop a new shape and group. From March 2018 there are two more places available in this group, which is open to experienced therapists only from across the modalities. All of the current participants work also as supervisors, tutors or teachers alongside their private practice and share a perspective that draws from both humanistic and psychoanalytic traditions. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

Participants

This group is open to experienced therapists from across the modalities who have been working for at least 12 years. It currently has 5 members; the maximum group size is 7 participants, so from 2018 there are one or two more places available in this group. Currently we have one man and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

Format and ways of working

All of the current participants also work as supervisors, tutors or teachers alongside their private practice and share a perspective that draws from both humanistic and psychoanalytic traditions. The group has an integrative cross- and multi-modality framework and has developed a supervision style that emphasises reflections on the manifestations of transference and countertransference via enactments.

If you are an experienced practitioner and have a curiosity and interest in relational ways of working as well as psychotherapy integration, stretching beyond the therapeutic approach you originally trained in, then this may be a good group for your further development.

As with all supervisory/learning work, there is an overlap between personal and professional development, and Michael and the group have been working to find a good balance between the two. The group has evolved a culture of sharing our work in an experiential way, through role play and two-chair work alongside traditional presentation and discussion. You would need to be comfortable in sharing yourself in such a group supervision format with an emphasis on experiential learning, which naturally opens up the opportunity to discuss therapeutic perspectives, theory and practice across the modalities.

Several participants, as well as Michael, have an interest in embodied ways of working and are bringing that to the group.

Practicalities

Times: meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays 10:30 to 17:00.

With 6 participants the fee per day is £110, plus £16 per person for the room we are renting.

With 7 participants the fee per day is £100, plus £15 per person for the room we are renting.

For more detailed information about the background, format and content of the weekend workshop, download the leaflet.

If you are interested in joining this group, an interview with Michael is required. You can contact him on: michael.soth@gmail.com or 07929208217. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

If you are interested in joining this group, an interview with Michael is required. You can contact him on: michael.soth@gmail.com or 07929208217. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

The scheduled Tuesdays for the remainder of the academic year 2017/2018 are:

30 Jan 2018; 13 Mar 2018; 8 May 2018; 26 Jun 2018

 

Jun
30
Sat
2018
London, Ealing – Ongoing Professional Development Group for Experienced Therapists
Jun 30 @ 10:00 – 17:00

This group is for experienced therapists only (practising for 8 years or more), and has had a consistent core group of participants for the last 6 few years, meeting 4 - 5 days per year. There is a pool of 18 participants, and 2 more places are available from 2018. See the dedicated page for detailed info.

Oxford: Integrative Trauma Therapy – 3 CPD Days with Morit Heitzler 2018 – Workshop 1 @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Jun 30 @ 10:00 – 17:00

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Download the leaflet

Download the booking form to email back

Download the booking form to print and post

Jul
3
Tue
2018
Oxford bi-monthly Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group
Jul 3 @ 10:00 – 16:30

Oxford Ongoing Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group

An integrative, experiential CPD group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays in West Oxford (10.00 – 16.30)

maximum 7 participants - 2 places available from March 2018

Purpose and scope of group

This advanced group is open to experienced counsellors and psychotherapists from different therapeutic approaches, orientations and trainings. It is an ongoing integrative group, meeting 6 times per year, and it has been running since 2012 in varying configurations and with various members.

There is an established group dynamic and cohesion, and as new participants you, me and the existing group would have to work with how you would fit into that to develop a new shape and a new group.

Participants (2 places available from March 2018)

Three participants have been with the group since the beginning (all three are experienced TA therapists). Two embodied-relational therapists joined a couple of years ago. Other members have been from various modalities, including Gestalt, transpersonal, Core Process. There is a solid emphasis on the relational dynamic between client and therapist, including transference, countertransference and enactments.

We are looking for one or two more participants. Currently we have one man and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

Format and ways of working

The idea is for the work of the group to be grounded in clinical experience and to have a solid supervision element, but to include additional reflections and theoretical input arising from the process - this will be from an integral-relational perspective, but always stay relevant and applicable to your own style and modality. Working with the general notion of the 'reflective practitioner', we will try to integrate individual and group process as well as experiential and theoretical learning and clinical reflection.

I will attempt to make explicit and accessible some of my internal process and working models as a supervisor and group facilitator, including hand-outs and references, depending on your individual learning needs and development goals as a person and as a therapist.

The way the group has developed over recent years has been to increasingly include participants’ own process, and how that shapes their therapeutic position as well as their impact on the group dynamic and the relationships we have with each other. So there is a considerable degree of self-disclosure and corresponding emotional intensity between group members, and anybody joining the group would probably need to be curious about and open to that kind of engagement.

Practicalities

The times are established and fixed (bi-monthly Tuesdays 10.00 – 16.30 in West Oxford), but apart from that the group is open to the needs and interests of further participants. Depending on the final number of participants, the cost will be between £90 and maximum £110.

The scheduled dates for the remainder of the academic year 2017/2018 are:

6 Mar 2018; 17 Apr 2018; 22 May 2018; 3 Jul 2018

For more detailed information about the background, format and content of the weekend workshop, download the leaflet.

If you are interested in joining this group, an interview with Michael is required. You can contact him on: michael.soth@gmail.com or 07929208217. Please enquire soon if you are interested in joining.

 

Jul
17
Tue
2018
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Jul 17 @ 13:30 – 15:30

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45). From January 2018 there are 3 places available in the second group - please contact Michael for details. The cost is £55 for each 2-hour group.

download the leaflet

Dates for 2018:

16/1/18; 20/2/18; 20/3/18; 24/4/18; 15/5/18; 19/6/18; 17/7/18

These groups have been running for the last few years, and there is a consistent core of participants, but some re-arrangements have meant that 3 places are now becoming available (in Group 2).

The monthly frequency of these groups means they are not really a replacement for ongoing regular supervision, but are being used by participants as part of their continuing professional development, to deepen and enhance their practice. The diversity of modalities, orientations and styles provides a rich learning environment.

Michael's supervision style is integrative, so therapists from all modalities and orientations are welcome, and will find plenty of opportunities to learn from the diversity within the group.
Michael pays attention to parallel process on all levels (see his presentation on 'Fractal Self' at CONFER for how he has extended the notion of 'parallel process', for the purposes of supervision, as well as an organising principle for therapy generally), including how the client-therapist dynamic is picked up by the group and reflected within it. He is welcoming of experiential exploration of 'charged moments', via roleplay, within participants' need and willingness for exposure in the group.

He will focus on speaking in the language of each supervisee's approach, but an exploration of transference-countertransference dynamics is likely to be included, unless a supervisee explicitly declines this. In his approach to supervision, Michael pays attention to the embodied, non-verbal communications and unconscious processes, how they oscillate between working alliance and enactment, and how the therapist's habitual stance/position becomes involved in these conflicts and tensions. Whilst the exploration of the therapist's relational entanglement is an important aspect of the supervision, the focus is on the deepening of the client's process, and the therapist's continuing learning process. Michael believes that by embracing whole-heartedly the difficulties, paradoxes, shadow aspects and complexities of the therapeutic process, therapists stand the best chance of doing justice to their clients, as well as their own authority, effectiveness and satisfaction as a practitioner.

Aug
2
Thu
2018
Pakistan: Psychotherapy Integration – a CPCAB Level 5 Counselling Course – Module 3 @ TherapyWorks
Aug 2 @ 15:00 – Aug 16 @ 17:00

Who is the course for?

This intermediate course is designed for practising counsellors and therapists, who have been working for a few years, to help you develop your own therapeutic style and identity and find your place within the wider field of counselling and psychotherapy (and the psychological therapies in general).

The aim of the course is to work towards a comprehensive map of the field and develop a relational meta-position that integrates the whole broad range of approaches. This can help us evolve beyond a merely eclectic stance which picks and chooses pragmatically or randomly from the smorgasboard of traditional approaches, but provides a rhyme and reason for how we navigate the complex and confusing multitude of approaches.

Broad-spectrum integration of approaches (without minimising contradictions)

By aiming at broad-spectrum psychotherapy integration, the aim is to support you in developing a therapeutic position that can draw flexibly from the whole range and diversity of approaches. Usually such an integrative project tends to minimise the significant extent to which the different approaches are not just similar or complementary to each other, but are also confusingly contradictory. However, we will try to work towards an integrative understanding without minimising or circumventing the contradictions between the approaches.

Integration beyond theories and techniques

The basic principle of the course will be a shift away from the attempt to integrate the theories and techniques of traditional approaches and towards an integration of ‘relational modalities’, using a variety of models to clarify what we mean by ‘relational modalities’ (or different kinds of therapeutic relatedness, or simpler: different ‘relational spaces’).

Recognising gifts and shadow aspects of each traditional approach

We are not aiming at an integration that mixes and combines two (or a few) different traditional approaches. In this module we are aiming at a broad-spectrum integration, attempting to draw out of each of the traditional approaches and paradigms its special gifts, wisdoms and sensibilities (whilst recognising also its shadow aspects). Beyond that, we will be working on the assumption that even the contradictions and challenges between the approaches can become valid and meaningful information in the therapeutic position.

Integrating the main branches of the psychological therapies (humanistic vs psychodynamic vs CBT)

On the most basic level, we will want to validate and integrate humanistic, psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioural traditions (as well as those that are more difficult to classify, i.e. systemic, existential, transpersonal and modern hybrid approaches) as the main branches of the therapeutic field, recognising that these traditions are underpinned by paradigm clashes between them (specifically: paradigm clashes that are not reconcilable on the level of theory and technique, nor meta-psychology).

Integration on the basis of diverse relational spaces

This module is based on the recognition that on a level deeper than theory and technique the contradictions between paradigms are rooted in different relational positions or stances and the contradictions and tensions between those.

A significant foundation of the course will be an enquiry into the processes - conscious and unconscious - that shape a therapist's relational position in response to a particular client. In order to investigate these processes, we will be drawing on traditional psychodynamic understandings of transference and countertransference, but we will also have to significantly go beyond this terminology and theoretical framework, by integrating ‘one-person-’ and ‘two-person psychologies’ (using the model by Martha Stark), modern relational perspectives as well as bodymind models of the therapeutic relationship.

Integrating different kinds of therapeutic relatedness (Gomez, Stark & Clarkson)

In reflecting on the therapist’s internal process within and in response to relational dynamics, we will also be distinguishing the therapist’s habitual stance and countertransference from situational countertransference, and will be integrating Petruska Clarkson's model of a multiplicity of relational modalities. Michael has developed the Clarkson model further and integrated it with Gomez’s critique of integration as well as Stark’s model – he calls this integration his ‘diamond model’.

Developing your own style and integration

This ‘diamond model’ is meant to be a comprehensive ‘meta-model’ and should give you a good foundation for integrating a wide range of therapeutic approaches, whatever their particular theories and techniques, helping you develop your own blend of theories and ways of working and your own style of being a therapist.

Tutors

The four 7-day modules of the course will be taught in Karachi, Pakistan by Michael Soth and Jan Mojsa. For all further details including booking, please contact TherapyWorks Pakistan.

 

Sep
8
Sat
2018
Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group with Nick Totton
Sep 8 @ 10:00 – Sep 9 @ 17:00

Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2018 (Weekend 4 of 5 with Nick)

These workshops, designed for counsellors and psychotherapists from across the approaches, are an opportunity to work with and learn from two of the most experienced trainers at the forefront of bringing embodiment into psychotherapy.
Rather than grafting the body onto established practice as one more eclectic technique, Nick and Michael have been working towards a non-dualistic embodied way of being and relating in the therapeutic relationship.
This series of CPD training events provides an ideal container for your continuing professional development, rooted in your own embodied process.

For full details  regarding this unique venture in Britain's Southwest, see the dedicated page: Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2018.

It is likely that the group will continue in 2019 with another series of four weekends.

Sep
22
Sat
2018
Oxford: Integrative Trauma Therapy – 3 CPD Days with Morit Heitzler 2018 – Workshop 2 @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Sep 22 @ 10:00 – 17:00

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Download the leaflet

Download the booking form to email back

Download the booking form to print and post

Sep
23
Sun
2018
North London – Ongoing Integrative CPD Group (currently closed)
Sep 23 @ 10:00 – 17:00

An ongoing, broad-spectrum integrative group

This semi-closed group has been running for several years now, with new participants joining the 'pool' of members as places become available. Led by one of the most experienced integrative trainers in the UK, this group will provide an ideal relational container for your ongoing development as a therapist. By immersing yourself in a diverse group of colleagues from different schools and orientations, you will widen your perspective, deepen your practice, draw both inspiration and challenge from the co-created wide-ranging experiential work and have a reference point as well as resources and teaching to support your further development.

You can find a detailed description of the format and objectives of this group on the dedicated page.

Nov
3
Sat
2018
London, Ealing – Ongoing Professional Development Group for Experienced Therapists
Nov 3 @ 10:00 – 17:00

This group is for experienced therapists only (practising for 8 years or more), and has had a consistent core group of participants for the last 6 few years, meeting 4 - 5 days per year. There is a pool of 18 participants, and 2 more places are available from 2018. See the dedicated page for detailed info.

Nov
17
Sat
2018
Athens: Working with Illness in Psychotherapy
Nov 17 @ 10:00 – Nov 18 @ 18:00

The bodymind connection in working with psychosomatic and physical symptoms

A weekend workshop in Athens with Michael Soth (17 & 18 November 2018)

Even though counsellors and psychotherapists are traditionally expected to focus on emotional, mental and verbal communications, many clients invariably do bring their physical and psychosomatic symptoms into the session.

Through including body-oriented ways of working into the talking therapies, we can learn to work with many of these symptoms more directly, more deeply and more effectively (and recognise other situations where the hope of curing illness through psychology is an unreasonable idealisation).

This CPD workshop is designed to expand your understanding of the bodymind connection as well as offering a wide range of creative and body-oriented techniques to include in your practice.

With some illnesses - like hypertension, chest and heart problems, digestive illnesses, symptoms of the immune system - it is scientifically established that emotional stress contributes to their origin. With many other psychosomatic problems, like all kinds of pain, tinnitus, insomnia, chronic fatigue and many other unexplained symptoms, it is known that the intensity of the suffering can be ameliorated through psychological therapy that addresses the regulation and expression of emotion and de-stresses the mind.

Stress is the catchall phrase that supposedly explains the influence of our psychological body-emotion-mind state on illness. However, what is less well understood, is how our bodymind does not just respond to stresses in our current situation and lifestyle, but carries accumulated stress from the past, reaching all the way back to childhood. A holistic and bio-social-psychological understanding of stress needs to include lifelong patterns of the bodymind including developmental injury and trauma (what Wilhelm Reich originally called character structures).

Sometimes clients bring psychosomatic illness as a presenting issue to the therapy, sometimes these symptoms actually evolve in direct response to the unfolding therapeutic process, and the therapist gets implicated in them, e.g. “After last session I had a headache for three days!”

Direct links to body sensations and symptoms as well as body image come up as part of our work in sessions every day, in so many ways: tangible pains, tensions, trembling and shaking, breathing difficulties (hyperventilation, asthma), the physical side of unbearable feelings like panic, rage, dread or terror. There are obvious somatic aspects to presenting issues such as eating disorders or addictions. And then there are the psychological implications of actual, sometimes terminal, illnesses and psychosomatic symptoms and dis-ease.

 

How do we work with these issues and symptoms in psychotherapy? What ways are available to us for including the client’s ‘felt sense’, their embodied self states, their body awareness and sensations, their physiological experience in the interaction ?

This workshop will give you a framework for thinking about the role of the body as it is relevant in your own style of therapeutic work, based upon the different ways in which clients as well as therapists relate to ‘the symptom’. Throughout the workshop, we will use roleplay of actual issues and dilemmas brought up by your clients. We will also identify and practice ways in which you can explore the emotional function and 'meaning' of your client's physical symptom or illness.

Drawing on a wide range of humanistic and psychoanalytic approaches (including Body Psychotherapy, Process-oriented Psychology, various schools of psychoanalysis and Jungian perspectives) as well as the holistic paradigm underpinning most complementary therapies, we will weave together an interdisciplinary bodymind approach which is applicable within the therapeutic relationship as we know it in counselling and psychotherapy.

 

Michael has been working with the psychological and bodymind connection of illness and psychosomatic symptoms for many years. In the 1990s he initiated a project called 'Soul in Illness', offering an integrative psychotherapeutic perspective, drawing on the wisdom which the different therapeutic approaches have accumulated regarding illness, both in terms of theoretical understanding and practical ways of working. He has run CPD workshops for therapists on ‘Working with Illness’ many times, and has developed a relational and embodied way of engaging with the client’s bodymind. In 2005 he presented for the first time his model of ‘8 ways of relating to the symptom’, which addresses the client’s own relationship to their symptom, as well as giving an overview of the different stances taken by the therapist in the various therapeutic approaches that correspond to each of the ways of relating to the symptom. These eight ways of relating to the symptom, including the corresponding theoretical understandings as well as methods and techniques for intervention, will form the underlying framework for this workshop.

 

Nov
25
Sun
2018
North London – Ongoing Integrative CPD Group (currently closed)
Nov 25 @ 10:00 – 17:00

An ongoing, broad-spectrum integrative group

This semi-closed group has been running for several years now, with new participants joining the 'pool' of members as places become available. Led by one of the most experienced integrative trainers in the UK, this group will provide an ideal relational container for your ongoing development as a therapist. By immersing yourself in a diverse group of colleagues from different schools and orientations, you will widen your perspective, deepen your practice, draw both inspiration and challenge from the co-created wide-ranging experiential work and have a reference point as well as resources and teaching to support your further development.

You can find a detailed description of the format and objectives of this group on the dedicated page.

See Calendar with all Events >>

INTEGRA CPD - Trainers

Michael Soth
Michael SothIntegral-Relational Body Psychotherapist (UKCP)
Michael is an Oxford-based integral-relational Body Psychotherapist, trainer and supervisor, with more than 28 years' experience of practising and teaching from an integrative perspective.
More about Michael >>
Morit Heitzler
Morit HeitzlerIntegrative Body Psychotherapist (Msc, UKCP)
Morit is an Integrative Body Psychotherapist (UKCP) based in West Oxford, where she maintains a private practice. She has been teaching in the UK and in Israel for more than 15 years.
More about Morit >>