The main principles of our multi-dimensional integrative approach

  • Integration: drawing on the best elements from across the multitude of approaches
  • Recognising the common factors between approaches
  • Appreciating and making use of the conflicts and differences between the approaches
  • Integrating all the main branches of the therapeutic field
  • Drawing on a rich diversity of specific approaches
  • Re-visioning all theories and approaches through a bodymind perspective
  • Balancing the mental-verbal bias of the ‘talking therapies’
  • Emphasising non-verbal and otherwise subliminal communication
  • Integrating both spontaneous and reflective processes and capacities
  • Working with all the levels of bodymind experience (body - emotion - imagination - mind - intuition)
  • Emphasising the relational aspects of the therapeutic relationship
  • Recognising different forms of therapeutic relatedness / modalities of therapeutic relationship (Petruska Clarkson)
  • Integrating the modalities into an holistic dynamic embodied whole (the ‘diamond model’ - Soth 2007)
  • Taking into account many dimensions and layers of unconscious processes (including traditional transference and countertransference)
  • Recognising the paradoxical nature of ‘enactment’ (counter-therapeutic versus transformative) as central to the therapeutic endeavour
  • Inclusive stance towards one-person, one-and-a-half person, two-person and many-person psychologies (Martha Stark)
  • Recent developments in
  • Recognising the importance of right-brain to right-brain attunement
  • Re-visioning the relationship between body and mind
  • Application of systems theory and systemic understanding to psychology
  • Multi-dimensional = integral (Wilber)
  • Recognition of parallel processes on each level and between different levels of system
  • Connection between inner world (whole bodymind) as a system and outer world systems (family, social, cultural, global)
  • Recognition of inner and outer ecology of bodymind systems
  • Our own woundedness as the foundation of our therapeutic presence
  • Embracing our own wounded self as the instrument through which we work
  • Transcending the doctor-patient dualism
  • Therapy as an ‘impossible profession’
  • Paradoxical notion of the working alliance and the therapeutic relationship
  • The client’s conflict becomes the therapist’s conflict
  • Enactment as the paradox at the heart of relational therapy
  • Therapy as an ‘impossible profession’
  • Paradoxical notion of the working alliance and the therapeutic relationship
  • The client’s conflict becomes the therapist’s conflict
  • Enactment as the paradox at the heart of relational therapy
  • Self-organisation and the conflict between established structures and emergent processes
  • Extending the traditional meaning of ‘parallel process’ into a new model and organising principle for therapy (fractal self - Soth 2006)

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