Past Events

Past Events2017-03-07T19:53:24+00:00
There are four different ways in which you can display the forthcoming events (use the drop-down menu on the left to switch between them): Calendar, Agenda, Stream, and Posterboard. You can use the Categories drop-down menu to filter the display and restrict it to certain kinds of events. To de-select categories and show all events, click the crossed circle next to the currently displayed category.
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None of these previous listings include proposed events - there is a separate page for those in the menu: Proposed Events.

Nov
17
Sat
2018
Athens: Embodied perspectives on couples and couple work @ Vasilisis Sofia 51
Nov 17 @ 10:00 – Nov 18 @ 18:00
Athens: Embodied perspectives on couples and couple work @ Vasilisis Sofia 51 | Athens | Greece

A weekend workshop in Athens with Michael Soth (17 & 18 November 2018)

on extending your practice from individuals to couples

suitable for all counsellors and therapists from across all therapeutic approaches

Couple work presents many additional challenges beyond individual therapy, but this weekend will condense the essentials into accessible form, focusing especially on the advantages which an embodied and integrative therapeutic perspective can bring to couple work.

An embodied perspective can significantly enhance couple work, in all aspects of the process: in terms of the therapist’s perceptive skills, our understanding of the dynamic as well as powerful opportunities for intervention. The habitual patterns and vicious circles which couples struggle with are mainly triggered, communicated and perpetuated on non-verbal and pre-reflexive levels (as interpersonal neurobiology shows – see references).

For most couples, mutual projective identifications occur subliminally and are difficult to notice and bring into awareness, especially when the couple therapist traditionally relies on ‘talking therapy’ methods and interpretations.

An integrative approach allows the therapist a creative range of interventions – using techniques from Gestalt, constellations, process-oriented psychology to help the couple discover experientially both the roots of their patterns as well as new ways of relating.

Michael will propose a distinction of the field into 8 kinds of couple therapy, drawing on a wide variety of humanistic, interpersonal, neuro-biological, systemic, and psychoanalytic approaches, all of which can be useful and contribute to a more comprehensive integration.

Some of the topics we may address:

  • “Can Love Last?” (after the book by Stephen Mitchell) – the vulnerability of attachment and commitment
  • the promise of falling in love: the other will provide protection against woundedness
  • embodied awareness of each partner’s internal object relations
  • complex vicious cycles of child – idealised parent – bad parent - child
  • mutual projective identifications (how the partners ‘dream each other up’)
  • the systemic fit: who the partners represent in each other’s family system
  • the Jungian and transpersonal perspective: each partner can become the other’s guide towards individuation (which involves as a side-effect of the relationship the destroying of each other’s defences)
  • Esther Perel’s contributions to our understanding of infidelity and erotic desire

Michael Soth has been developing his version of Embodied Integrative Couple Work over the last 12 years, and has worked with a wide variety of couples. He is an integral-relational Body Psychotherapist, trainer and supervisor (UKCP), living in Oxford, UK. Over the last 32 years he has been teaching on a range of counselling and therapy training courses, alongside working as Training Director at the Chiron Centre for Body Psychotherapy.

Inheriting concepts, values and ways of working from both psychoanalytic and humanistic traditions, he is interested in the therapeutic relationship as a bodymind process between two people who are both wounded and whole.

In his work and teaching, he integrates an unusually wide range of psychotherapeutic approaches, working towards a broad-spectrum integration of all therapeutic modalities and approaches, each with their gifts, wisdoms and expertise as well as their shadow aspects, fallacies and areas of obliviousness.

Extracts from his published writing as well as hand-outs, blogs and summaries of presentations are available through his website for INTEGRA CPD: www.integra-cpd.co.uk.

Interview on couple work

In preparation for the CPD workshop on couple work in Athens, Michael is interviewed by a Greek colleague:

  • Michael, why do we need companionship? Is it an innate need or just something we learned from society and we are trying to reproduce it?
  • Are there some distinct stages that interpersonal relationships go through? If so, can you summarize them?
  • In the description of your seminar I read with surprise that “one of the purposes / side-effects of the relationship is to destroy each other’s defences”. Can you elaborate?
  • Michael, according to your experience, what are the reasons why many people prefer to stay in a existing relationship that doesn’t offer anything any more, rather than set a new course and go for a better relationship?
  • Many times I have wondered in my life: am I falling in love with the person that I see in front of me or the longings and expectations that this person is producing in me? Am I falling in love with the other or an imaginary part of myself? Is there a way to distinguish one case from the other?
  • Is love enough by itself to keep a relationship going?
  • In your opinion, what is the biggest mistake that therapists and mental health professionals make when approaching couple therapy?
  • You talk about embodied couple therapy - what is that and how does it work? What does an embodied approach have to offer in addition to the talking therapies for couples?
  • Is learning about couple work useful only to couple therapists?

You can access the PDF with the interview here.

References for Couple Therapy

Stephen Mitchell (Relational Psychoanalysis): Can Love Last?

Esther Perel:

Mating in Captivity

The State Of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity

Esther Perel website

Esther Perel TED talk

James Hillman: see chapter ‘Abandonment in Marriage’ in Loose Ends: Primary Papers in Archetypal Psychology

A Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy:

Stan Tatkin https://thepactinstitute.com

Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy:

Sue Johnson: http://drsuejohnson.com/emotionally-focused-therapy-2/what-is-eft/

https://www.psychotherapy.net/article/couples-therapy-attachment

Imago Therapy:

Harville Hendrix, PhD: Getting The Love You Want: A Guide for Couples

http://imagorelationships.org/pub/

http://imagorelationships.org/pro/

Couples Therapist Hedy Schleifer:

“Couples Therapist Hedy Schleifer, along with her husband Yumi Schleifer, are expert relationship coaches who lead workshops for couples, and trainings for therapists and organizations, transforming relationships worldwide.”

Psychoanalytic (Tavistock) perspectives on relationships

Stanley Ruszczynski

Psychotherapy With Couples: Theory and Practice at the Tavistock Institute of Marital Studies

Jungian perspectives on love

Robert A. Johnson

She: Understanding Feminine Psychology

He: Understanding Masculine Psychology

We: Understanding the Psychology of Romantic Love

The Fisher King and the Handless Maiden: Understanding The Wounded Feeling Function In Masculine And Feminine Psychology

Clarissa Pinkola Estes

Women Who Run With The Wolves: Contacting the Power of the Wild Woman

Untie the Strong Woman: Blessed Mother's Immaculate Love for the Wild Soul

Jean Shinoda Bolen

Goddesses in Everywoman: Thirtieth Anniversary Edition: Powerful Archetypes in Women's Lives

Nathan Schwartz-Salant

Schwartz-Salant, N. (1998) The Mystery of Human Relationship: Alchemy and the Transformation of the Self

Family Therapy

Virginia Satir:

(1991) The Satir Model: Family Therapy and Beyond (Science and Behavior Books)

(2008) Your Many Faces: The First Step to Being Loved (Celestial Arts)

Salvador Minuchin:

Mastering Family Therapy: Journeys of Growth and Transformation

The Craft of Family Therapy: Challenging Certainties

Family Constellations

Bert Hellinger:

Love's Hidden Symmetry: What Makes Love Work in Relationships - The Order of Love

Nov
20
Tue
2018
Oxford bi-monthly Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group @ Botley, West Oxford
Nov 20 @ 10:00 – 16:30

Oxford Ongoing Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group

An integrative, experiential CPD group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays in West Oxford (10.00 – 16.30)

maximum 7 participants - currently closed

For further information, see the dedicated page

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Nov
24
Sat
2018
Oxford: Trauma-focussed Supervision Group @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Nov 24 @ 10:00 – 16:00

Small Supervision Group with Morit Heitzler

Date: Sat. 24 November 2018 - Times: 10.00 – 16.00

Venue: OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre: 1st Floor, 142-144 Oxford Road, Temple Cowley, Oxford OX4 2EA

Cost per session: £85.00

This 1-day Saturday supervision group is an opportunity for you to specifically bring trauma clients for supervision - the day will be a mixture of clinical supervision of actual cases presented by participants and CPD learning (including some role play of case vignettes). Alongside learning from your own and other participants' experience, Morit will also give trauma-related teaching input, relevant to the themes and issues emerging from the clinical/client work.

Possible ongoing group emerging from this supervision day

There is a core group of several therapists who want this day to develop into an ongoing, regular group. The sessions will take place every 2 - 3 months from 10 - 4pm in Oxford, to be arranged in advance according to everybody's availability. The cost per session will be £85.00. If you have any questions or need more information, please contact Morit.

Nov
25
Sun
2018
North London – Ongoing Integrative CPD Group (currently closed)
Nov 25 @ 10:00 – 17:00

An ongoing, broad-spectrum integrative group

This semi-closed group has been running for several years now, with new participants joining the 'pool' of members as places become available. Led by one of the most experienced integrative trainers in the UK, this group will provide an ideal relational container for your ongoing development as a therapist. By immersing yourself in a diverse group of colleagues from different schools and orientations, you will widen your perspective, deepen your practice, draw both inspiration and challenge from the co-created wide-ranging experiential work and have a reference point as well as resources and teaching to support your further development.

You can find a detailed description of the format and objectives of this group on the dedicated page.

Nov
27
Tue
2018
London: bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists @ Terapia Centre
Nov 27 @ 10:15 – 16:45

London bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists

An integrative, experiential supervision group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

This group (maximum 7 participants, meeting once every 2 months on a Tuesday in Hendon, North London 10:15 to 16:45) originally organised by Eamonn Marshall, has been running since 2014, meeting 6 times per year, in varying configurations and with various members. It is open to experienced therapists from across the modalities who have been working for at least 12 years.

It currently has 6 members; the maximum group size is 7 participants, so from autumn 2018 there is one more place available in this group. Currently we have two men and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

For further information, see the dedicated page

 

Dec
1
Sat
2018
Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group with Michael Soth @ The Wheelhouse
Dec 1 @ 10:00 – Dec 2 @ 17:00

Exeter: Embodied Approaches to Therapeutic Theories of Developmental Wounding and Habitual Patterns

This workshop, designed for counsellors and psychotherapists from across the approaches, is an opportunity to work with and learn from one of the most experienced trainers at the forefront of bringing embodiment into psychotherapy in the UK. Rather than grafting the body onto established practice as one more eclectic technique, Michael has been working towards a non-dualistic embodied way of being and relating in the therapeutic relationship.
This series of CPD training events provides an ideal container for your continuing professional development, rooted in your own embodied process.

For full details  regarding this unique venture in Britain's Southwest, see the dedicated page: Exeter: Body-oriented CPD Weekend Group 2019. It is likely that the group will continue in 2020 with another series of weekends.

The presenting past

The majority of humanistic and integrative approaches these days relies on developmental theory in the way that psychoanalytic traditions have always done. We see the client's current problems in their adult life as intricately linked to life-long habitual patterns that originated in childhood. We see the client's capacity for engaging in their adult life as a result and as a function of their developmental wounding and importantly as a function of their defences against that wounding. We assume these defensive habits were established early on and continue to influence or dominate the person's present reality; in the words of a famous psychodynamic textbook, we could summarise this widely established focus on developmental injury across the various therapeutic approaches as the 'presenting past'.

Different therapeutic approaches have developed different jargons and languages to describe these patterns from the past: working models, RIG's, schemas, scripts, ego states, contact disturbances, complexes, attachment styles, character structures and many more.

Differences & contradictions between the models

However, there are significant philosophical and theoretical differences between the various traditional models which as therapists we use to name, describe and conceptualise the client's early developmental blueprint for the relational patterns we co-create with them in the intersubjective field of the therapeutic relationship.

The diverse traditions (psychoanalytic developmental theory, attachment theory, character structure theory, TA, intersubjectivity, relationality) each have their assumptions, conceptual frames, jargon terms, and their particular gifts and shadow aspects in disclosing or occluding certain areas of the field of relating between client and therapist. How the myriad complex aspects of the field do or do not enter the therapist's stream of consciousness depends to some extent on the theoretical lenses we use.

To widen our awareness and make it as conceptually unbiased and inclusive as possible, we can ground our observations of the relational dynamic in the detail of bodymind process, much of it non-verbal, some of it subliminal.

Grounding different therapeutic approaches to habitual patterns of relating in bodymind process

This weekend is dedicated to clarifying both theoretically and practically the differences, contradictions and overlaps between the various traditional languages and models, by attending to their fundamental ideas (e.g. attachment styles, working models, co-creation, character styles, self-states and mutual recognition, habitual patterns, etc) as bodymind processes.

This may allow us to build an experience-near integration that creates a productive synergy between these different traditions and diverse theoretical frames. Although theoretical principles will be involved, we will stick to the basic ideas rather than go into abstract or historical detail - the overall aim of the weekend is to keep it practical and applicable.

Learning Objectives

This could include a process of comparing & contrasting:

  • attachment theory (Bowlby, Ainsworth, Holmes)
  • character structure theory (Reich, Lowen, Kurtz & Johnson)
  • Transactional Analysis developmental theory (ego-states and scripts)
  • psychoanalytic developmental theory (including Kleinian and object relations)
  • intersubjectivity (Atwood & Stolorow, Orange) & relational psychoanalysis (Mitchell, Aron, Bromberg, and others)

We will attempt to ground the key notions of these theories in embodied, experience-near terms. And we will explore how these different ideas both help and hinder us in apprehending the fullness and systemic wholeness of the relational dynamic between client and therapist.

The weekend is a unique introduction to the overlaps and differences (and possible synergies) between the different models which therapists commonly use to make sense of their experience in the therapeutic relationship. This includes especially attachment theory, character structure theory, TA and relational modalities. All these theories aim to help us in making sense of the client's relational pattern and behaviour in the therapeutic relationship. All of them have two-person psychology elements and can be used in that way; but all can also be used in a more one-person psychology diagnostic fashion, by focusing mainly on the client's pattern of attachment and relating.

In this CPD weekend we will enhance the usefulness of all these models by thinking of about the inherent bodymind processes which we have observed as therapists before we can even apply any of the models - we will try to ground our use of the models in our phenomenological bodymind observations, of the client and of ourselves (and as these are traditional models, that includes the fact that they were used in connection with observations of transference and countertransference).

We will explore how these models complement each other and become more powerful in combination. And we will also look at the limitations and shadow aspects of each, and how as therapists we might end up using them in a way that blinds us to enactments, complications in the working alliance and impasses in the therapeutic process.

For detailed information, download the leaflet.

 

Oxford: Integrative Trauma Therapy – 3 CPD Days with Morit Heitzler 2018 – Workshop 2 @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Dec 1 @ 10:00 – 17:00

For all the background information and a workshop description of all three CPD days

see the dedicated page
see the dedicated page

Download the leaflet

Download the booking form to email back

Download the booking form to print and post

Dec
4
Tue
2018
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Dec 4 @ 13:30 – 15:30

Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups

Integrative, experiential supervision groups with Michael Soth

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis (Tuesdays) at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45).

Currently 1 place available (from 4 Dec 2018) in Group 3 - 15.45-17.45 - suits experienced therapist

For further information, see the dedicated page or download the leaflet

Jan
15
Tue
2019
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Jan 15 @ 13:30 – 15:30

Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups

Integrative, experiential supervision groups with Michael Soth

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis (Tuesdays) at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45).

Currently 1 place available (from 4 Dec 2018) in Group 3 - 15.45-17.45 - suits experienced therapist

For further information, see the dedicated page or download the leaflet

Jan
19
Sat
2019
OTS: The Client’s Conflict becomes the Therapist’s Conflict @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Jan 19 @ 10:00 – 17:00

OTS_header

How to spot it and what to do next - a step-by-step recipe book (for processing the therapist’s dilemmas)

Three things stood out from a recent OTS training workshop and the work we did in the small groups (as born out by some of the feedback):

  1. as therapists we don’t always know when we are in conflict;
  2. when we do know, we often hit a blank wall - what to do or how to understand what’s going on;
  3. in order to avoid the discomfort of the conflict, we take refuge in default therapeutic interventions, routine manoeuvres and habitual stances, i.e. mechanisms which dilute the necessary charge and tension in the relationship - in doing so, we abort the therapeutic process or precipitate ruptures in the alliance.

Some of the feedback was: ‘It is scary to feel like you don’t know what to do as a therapist, so it can be a relief to not know you are in conflict.’ (this is rather reminiscent of Bion’s statement: “In every consulting room there ought to be two rather frightened people.”)

Being aware of and acknowledging our internal (countertransference) conflict as therapists usually feels like we’re losing our therapeutic position and that we are failing. In order to avoid the inherent sense of feeling powerless and vulnerable, we resort to our ‘habitual position’ as therapists, trying to shore up our shaky therapeutic position.

One of the most common manoeuvres is to ask more questions of the client in the hope of 'eliciting further information' or ‘getting somewhere else’, where we can feel on safer ground. However, in doing so we then manage to fall into two further pitfalls:

  • by trying to ‘move on’ or ‘hold on’ to our therapeutic position, we give the implicit message to the client that we can’t bear their pain, and can’t sit in it with them;
  • because we are doing so defensively, prematurely and without awareness or preparation, our interventions precipitate us further into enactment: we fall down on one or the other side of our conflict, and fail to ‘hold’ the conflict, or to catch the rupture we are entangled in.

This training day will develop your capacity to be aware of your conflict as a therapist and learn to ‘sit in it’ without being overwhelmed by pressure, fear or shame. It then becomes more possible to extract the precious information which the therapist’s conflict contains about the relational dynamic and the client’s inner world.

Format of the day:

Lunch: As usual we will arrange a bring and share lunch in the week before the event.

Jan
29
Tue
2019
Oxford bi-monthly Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group @ Botley, West Oxford
Jan 29 @ 10:00 – 16:30

Oxford Ongoing Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group

An integrative, experiential CPD group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays in West Oxford (10.00 – 16.30)

maximum 7 participants - currently closed

For further information, see the dedicated page

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Feb
2
Sat
2019
North London – Ongoing Integrative CPD Group (currently closed) @ The Nebula
Feb 2 @ 10:00 – Feb 3 @ 17:00

An ongoing, broad-spectrum integrative group

This semi-closed group has been running for several years now, with new participants joining the 'pool' of members as places become available. Led by one of the most experienced integrative trainers in the UK, this group will provide an ideal relational container for your ongoing development as a therapist. By immersing yourself in a diverse group of colleagues from different schools and orientations, you will widen your perspective, deepen your practice, draw both inspiration and challenge from the co-created wide-ranging experiential work and have a reference point as well as resources and teaching to support your further development.

You can find a detailed description of the format and objectives of this group on the dedicated page.

Oxford: Integrative Trauma Therapy – 3 CPD Days with Morit Heitzler 2018 – Workshop 3 @ OTS-Oxford Therapy Centre
Feb 2 @ 10:00 – 17:00

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Download the leaflet

Download the booking form to email back

Download the booking form to print and post

Feb
5
Tue
2019
London: bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists @ Terapia Centre
Feb 5 @ 10:15 – 16:45

London bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists

An integrative, experiential supervision group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

This group (maximum 7 participants, meeting once every 2 months on a Tuesday in Hendon, North London 10:15 to 16:45) originally organised by Eamonn Marshall, has been running since 2014, meeting 6 times per year, in varying configurations and with various members. It is open to experienced therapists from across the modalities who have been working for at least 12 years.

It currently has 6 members; the maximum group size is 7 participants, so from autumn 2018 there is one more place available in this group. Currently we have two men and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

For further information, see the dedicated page

 

Feb
9
Sat
2019
London, Ealing – Ongoing Professional Development Group for Experienced Therapists @ Overton House
Feb 9 @ 10:00 – Feb 10 @ 17:00

This group is for experienced therapists only (practising for 10 years or more), and has had a consistent core group of participants for the last few years, meeting 4 - 5 days per year, usually for a whole weekend (10.00 - 17.00 both Saturday & Sunday). There is a pool of 18 participants, and 1 more place may be available from 2019.

The group consists mainly of integrative psychotherapists with a relational orientation, many of whom had a humanistic training initially, many years ago. Over the years the culture of the group has evolved, from an emphasis on CPD and supervision to include increasingly personal and group process. The format over a typical weekend varies creatively between working in the whole group, sessions in the middle of the group, small group work, with Michael facilitating in collaboration with the emergent processes in the group. Occasionally, Michael will give some theoretical input relevant to the process, or summarise the emerging themes.

See the dedicated page for detailed info

Feb
12
Tue
2019
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Feb 12 @ 13:30 – 15:30

Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups

Integrative, experiential supervision groups with Michael Soth

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis (Tuesdays) at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45).

Currently 1 place available (from 4 Dec 2018) in Group 3 - 15.45-17.45 - suits experienced therapist

For further information, see the dedicated page or download the leaflet

Mar
2
Sat
2019
How to Work when Therapy isn’t Working @ Brighton, East Sussex
Mar 2 @ 10:00 – 16:30

HelplessShakespearePerceiving and understanding 'enactment' in the therapeutic relationship

Over recent years the most exciting developments in our field have come via neuroscience, psychotherapy integration (i.e. cross-fertilisation between approaches) and the inclusion of the body. We now understand that whatever psychological wounds the client is bringing to us and into the consulting room, we will in some ways become involved and implicated with them in ways that go far beyond verbal interaction. The term ‘enactment’ is being used to describe the ways in which the therapist is - inevitably and necessarily - drawn into the client’s wounding, leading to impasses and breakdowns in the working alliance.
There is great therapeutic potential in these cycles of rupture and repair that occur in the client-therapist relationship, but much of it occurs subliminally. So if it occurs unconsciously, outside of awareness, how can we perceive and understand enactment and respond creatively from within it? Whilst there are a multitude of ways of ignoring, avoiding and counteracting enactment, there is also increasing understanding that it has deep transformative potential*.

This CPD workshop is dedicated to deepening our engagement with difficult dynamics in the therapeutic relationship, and to finding ways of accessing the therapeutic potential locked within them. It is open to all practising therapists, and suitable for practitioners from all modalities.

What you can expect to learn on the day …

  • perceive the ways in which the client’s wound enters the consulting room
  • register significant and charged moments in the relationship
  • understand these moments in the context of the ‘three kinds of contact'
  • collect in these moments bodymind information which would otherwise remain subliminal
  • collect in these moments images, fantasies, scenarios, narratives which deepen our engagement from within the enactment
  • link these moments to the client’s habitual relational patterns
  • process the charge and pressure impacting on the therapist
  • begin to consider interventions for relieving or intensifying the enactment pressure

* ‘Deep’ psychotherapy, according to Allan Schore, for example (i.e. therapy that addresses early developmental injury and attachment and character patterns) depends on apprehending, engaging in and transforming spontaneous enactments which occur in the interaction between client and therapist inspite of the client’s repressive and dissociative defences

Organisers: Brighton Therapy Partnership

This workshop is expertly organised by Shelley Holland from Brighton Therapy Partnership, who has been running an inspiring and well-attended CPD programme for many years now. You can find some feedback in response to previous workshops on Michael's tutor page there.

 

Mar
5
Tue
2019
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Mar 5 @ 13:30 – 15:30

Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups

Integrative, experiential supervision groups with Michael Soth

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis (Tuesdays) at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45).

Currently 1 place available (from 4 Dec 2018) in Group 3 - 15.45-17.45 - suits experienced therapist

For further information, see the dedicated page or download the leaflet

Mar
19
Tue
2019
London: bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists @ Terapia Centre
Mar 19 @ 10:15 – 16:45

London bi-monthly Advanced Supervision Group for Experienced Therapists

An integrative, experiential supervision group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

This group (maximum 7 participants, meeting once every 2 months on a Tuesday in Hendon, North London 10:15 to 16:45) originally organised by Eamonn Marshall, has been running since 2014, meeting 6 times per year, in varying configurations and with various members. It is open to experienced therapists from across the modalities who have been working for at least 12 years.

It currently has 6 members; the maximum group size is 7 participants, so from autumn 2018 there is one more place available in this group. Currently we have two men and four women, so potential male participants are especially welcome.

For further information, see the dedicated page

 

Mar
26
Tue
2019
Oxford bi-monthly Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group @ Botley, West Oxford
Mar 26 @ 10:00 – 16:30

Oxford Ongoing Supervision & Personal-Professional Development Group

An integrative, experiential CPD group for experienced therapists (12+ years) with Michael Soth

meeting bi-monthly on Tuesdays in West Oxford (10.00 – 16.30)

maximum 7 participants - currently closed

For further information, see the dedicated page

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Mar
30
Sat
2019
Exeter: The Embodiment of Relational Stances, Spaces & Modalities – Weekend 1 @ The Wheelhouse
Mar 30 @ 10:00 – Mar 31 @ 16:00
Apr
2
Tue
2019
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Apr 2 @ 13:30 – 15:30

Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups

Integrative, experiential supervision groups with Michael Soth

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis (Tuesdays) at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45).

Currently 1 place available (from 4 Dec 2018) in Group 3 - 15.45-17.45 - suits experienced therapist

For further information, see the dedicated page or download the leaflet

Apr
6
Sat
2019
Athens: Integrative Embodied-Relational Trauma Work with Morit Heitzler (tbc) @ Athens (tbc)
Apr 6 @ 10:00 – Apr 7 @ 17:00
Apr
30
Tue
2019
Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups @ Fulcrum House
Apr 30 @ 13:30 – 15:30

Bristol Monthly Small Supervision Groups

Integrative, experiential supervision groups with Michael Soth

These small supervision groups run on a regular monthly basis (Tuesdays) at Fulcrum House in Bristol. There are three groups with 4 participants each during each Tuesday (11.20-13.20; 13.30-15.30; 15.45-17.45).

Currently 1 place available (from 4 Dec 2018) in Group 3 - 15.45-17.45 - suits experienced therapist

For further information, see the dedicated page or download the leaflet

May
11
Sat
2019
North London – Ongoing Integrative CPD Group (currently closed) @ The Nebula
May 11 @ 10:00 – 17:00

An ongoing, broad-spectrum integrative group

This semi-closed group has been running for several years now, with new participants joining the 'pool' of members as places become available. Led by one of the most experienced integrative trainers in the UK, this group will provide an ideal relational container for your ongoing development as a therapist. By immersing yourself in a diverse group of colleagues from different schools and orientations, you will widen your perspective, deepen your practice, draw both inspiration and challenge from the co-created wide-ranging experiential work and have a reference point as well as resources and teaching to support your further development.

You can find a detailed description of the format and objectives of this group on the dedicated page.